The New Social Graces: Internet Faux Pas to Avoid

With the ever-changing internet landscape consistently bringing on new platforms and cool innovative tools, it’s essential to stay up-to-speed with the latest and greatest approaches to social media and web-based interactions. It’s something I talk about consistently because it’s so essential for both personal and professional growth these days. Whether you’re new to the social hemisphere or you’ve been around for quite a while, having the know-how to be the best you can be on the web will help build your credibility both in and out of the digital world. If you’re not sure what those new social graces might be, here’s a look at a few internet faux pas to avoid.

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The New Social Graces: Internet Faux Pas to Avoid

Tagging a Friend in an Unflattering Situation. None of us like to have our photo shared when we aren’t looking our best or are caught in a situation that’s better kept to our close network of friends – so why would you be the one to bring negative attention to someone else? When posting to social media, it’s important to tag and share posts about friends that support them and shows them at their finest.

Publically Venting About Personal Issues. The thing about social media is that it lives on the web – and that means it’s often searchable and findable. If you jump on Twitter or Facebook to vent about something personal, chances are someone from work, a potential employer or even a professional who you’d like to connect with would be exposed to your public vent sesh. In most cases, it’s best to keep those feelings to yourself – and off the web.

Cursing Your Coworkers Online. The web is the last place to take your feelings of anger and frustration when it comes to talking about work or your coworkers. When you have something positive to share – that’s a whole different story, but when it comes to expressing frustration, it’s time to take that to an in-person conversation.

Not Giving Credit When Sharing Someone Else’s Posts or Photos. The best thing you can do to help establish yourself as a savvy and credible source on the web, is to credit when and where credit is due. Rather than merely taking another person’s post or image and sharing it as your own, use social media for what it’s for – engaging and connecting. Reach out – tag that person or source – and comment on just how much you support and enjoyed what they shared.

Posting Images or Video of Yourself in Compromising Situations. If you’re moving full steam ahead with your career, giving yourself a social profile to be proud of is pretty essential – why share a photo you wouldn’t want your boss or clients to see? The bottom line: use good judgment and be discerning.

How about you? Got any tips to share when it comes to experiences with social graces on the web?

 

Career Advice, ENTREPRENEUR

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